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July 01, 2015

Work and workplaces can result in a hearing loss

Use of headphones and exposure to chemicals can result in a hearing loss. Many teachers also have a hearing loss, a study shows. Auditory injuries are the number one war wound among American veterans and in the U.S. more than one in four employees suspect that they have hearing loss, according to a study.

Headphones can harm hearing

The use of headphones at work can be dangerous and has been discovered to put a quarter of the U.K. workforce at risk of noise-induced hearing loss, according to a study. 

An estimated 7.6 million people in the U.K. are exposed to 3.5 hours of noise each day. Depending on how loudly workers listen to their headphones, it can damage their hearing.

Auditory injuries are the number one war wound

In the United States, 1.5 million military veterans suffer from hearing impairment caused by their time in the services. 

According to Hearing Health Foundation in the U.S., about 60% of younger war veterans who served in Afghanistan and Iraq returned home with hearing loss and/or tinnitus. 

Auditory injuries are so prevalent that the veterans have named it the number one war wound.

Hearing loss among American teachers

An American survey shows that 15% of American teachers have a diagnosed hearing loss. The problem is even more frequent for the younger teachers in the study. For teachers aged 18-44, 26% report a diagnosed hearing loss. 

The study also found that 60% of the teachers were concerned about hearing loss and that 27% of the teachers suspected having a hearing loss but had not sought any help.

One in four employees say they have a hearing loss

A survey in the U.S. has uncovered that more than one in four employees suspect that they have hearing loss. Of those, 95% respond that it impacts their work in a wide range of ways.

According to the survey, 61% of the employees with hearing loss reply that they have to ask people to repeat what they have said. 42% say they misunderstand what is being said and 41% respond that they pretend to hear when they cannot.

Chemical exposure linked to an increased risk of hearing loss

A Korean study has investigated chemical exposure and its contributions to increased risk of hearing loss among industry workers in Korea. 

The results showed a clear link between workers who were exposed to chemicals and hearing loss. Workers exposed to noise were 1.64 times more likely to develop a hearing loss compared to unexposed individuals, while workers exposed to both noise and heavy metals and/or organic solvents were 2.15 times more likely to develop a hearing loss.

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